TAKE THE NEW PLAY EXCHANGE (NPX) CHALLENGE

July 1st, 2015 donnahoke

 

I recently returned from the Citywrights Conference in Miami, where I sat on a panel about marketing your work online, along with Deborah Zoe Laufer and Gwydion Suilebhan, project director for the New Play Exchange (NPX). Part of what we discussed is the importance of having an online presence, a place where people interested in your plays can find you and your work. For many, this is a website, but barring (and certainly in addition to) that, NPX is a no-brainer place to start. For $10 a year, you can have an online presence that allows your plays to be instantly accessed by those who want to read them.

 

One of the promising features of NPX is the ability not only to read plays, but also to recommend them. In the process of culling information for Real Inspiration for Playwrights Project (RIPP), I heard again and again from Literary Managers and Artistic Directors that recommendations from other playwrights hold more value than recommendations from agents, producers, or others with vested interest. Playwrights’ recommendations are considered more pure, tinged with less agenda.

 

So, following a recent thread on Official Playwrights of Facebook, I vowed that I would make time to read more plays on NPX and, possibly, recommend them. Because all of theater is about relationships, we (as well as gatekeepers and decision-makers) all become much more interested in playwrights’ work when they become more than  playwrights to us, i.e. when we know them as people, and we are more than just names to each other. So, post-Citywrights, I decided to embark on my NPX playreading journey by starting with the new playwrights I’d met in Florida. What a tremendous way to get to know them even better through their work; great idea, right?

successopp

 

Well…. in theory. Because here’s the problem: most of them are NOT ON NPX. I’m talking to you Michael Yawney, David Hilder, Jo Morello, Louise Wigglesworth, Susan Miller, Greg Waters, France-Luce Benson, Daria Polatin, Leslie Ayvazian, Cusi Cram, Jane Elias, Susan Westfall, Staci Swedeen, and Susan Bernfield. That’s a lot of playwrights who I know are serious about their work, but whose work I can’t access. If you met a playwright—or a producer, or an artistic director, or a literary manager—would you want them to go looking for your work and not be able to easily find it? I hope the answer is no, and I hope you’re checking out NPX within the next five minutes.

 

On the flip side, Vince Gatton, Catherine Castellani, Deb Laufer, Lauren Feldman, Steve Yockey, Lauren Yee, and Elaine Romero (Seven! Only seven!): I tremendously enjoyed discovering your voices and attaching them to the people I’d just met—great fun! And when I go to the Dramatists Guild conference in La Jolla next month, I plan to continue this practice, because I feel like it deepens the relationships I’ve just begun.

 

challenge

 

So that’s the challenge: when you’re out and about in our world meeting new playwrights, help build the community and your relationships by finding them on NPX and reading (and maybe recommending) one of their plays. It’s a wonderful experience that reveals new layers about the person you just met, and strengthens our community. And if the playwright you’re looking for is not on NPX (and worst case, that playwright is YOU), maybe give them a little nudge, and consider it your good deed for the day.

 

Please follow me on Twitter @donnahoke or like me on Facebook at Donna Hoke, Playwright.

 

Written by donnahoke

donnahoke

Dramatists Guild Council member and ensemble playwright-in-residence at Road Less Traveled Productions, Kilroys List and award-winning playwright Donna Hoke’s work has been seen in 40 states, and on five continents. Her full-length plays include THE COUPLE NEXT DOOR (Princess Grace semi-finalist, currently in its third year in rep in Romania), SEEDS (Artie award winner for Outstanding New Play), FLOWERS IN THE DESERT (AACT top 20 finalist), SAFE (winner of the Todd McNerney National Playwriting Contest, Naatak National Playwriting Contest, and the 2015 Great Gay Play and Musical Contest), and BRILLIANT WORKS OF ART (2016 Kilroys List, Winner HRC Showcase, Firehouse Festival of New American Plays, top ten Woodward/Newman finalist); she’s also authored more than two dozen short plays that have had hundreds of productions. Donna is also a New York Times-published crossword puzzle constructor; author of Neko and the Twiggets, a children’s book; and founder/co-curator of BUA Takes 10: GLBT Short Stories. For three consecutive years, she was named Buffalo’s Best Writer by Artvoice, the only woman to ever receive the designation.

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7 Comments on “TAKE THE NEW PLAY EXCHANGE (NPX) CHALLENGE”

  1. 1 Catherine Castellani said at 4:08 pm on July 1st, 2015:

    Thank you, Donna! I have to get to your work (and everyone elses). I’m in reading mode!

    It’s also a good reminder to put up more work and to UPDATE (got an old draft hanging out there).

  2. 2 Roland Tec said at 4:26 pm on July 1st, 2015:

    Great piece, Donna. And, wow! I’m impressed with your tenacity and generosity in looking for these fellow wrights’ works on the Exchange. Very cool.

    How many plays have you read so far?

    – Roland

  3. 3 donnahoke said at 6:09 pm on July 3rd, 2015:

    Nine, Roland! I would have a longer list, but nobody else I met at Citywrights is on there yet. Now that I’ve put this out there, I’m terrified for La Jolla! 😉

  4. 4 Tiffany Antone said at 12:56 pm on July 2nd, 2015:

    Challenge Accepted! Love this idea, Donna!

    @LadyPlaywright

  5. 5 Mildred said at 3:28 pm on July 2nd, 2015:

    Greetings. Taking on the challenge. I’m reading then presumably recommending the awesomeness that is your work soon.

    Cheers!

  6. 6 Sheila Cowley said at 5:10 pm on July 2nd, 2015:

    So glad to hear more writers are using the New Play Exchange to discover and recommend new plays, as well as share their own work. Thanks much.

  7. 7 donnahoke said at 6:10 pm on July 3rd, 2015:

    Sorry it took so long to approve all these comments; they were all in my spam folder!


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